201 ALBEMARLE ST.

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201 ALBEMARLE ST.

201
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,
,

Comments

  • Submitted by M.R. Simpers on Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 9:05pm

    A few comments on the house at 201 Albemarle. It was not the “Tinzen (sic) house” but the “Pace house”. The Pace family was in Durham at the time of the 1910 Federal Census (FC) having come to Durham from Wake Co. My mother Dorothy Jane (Setzer) Simpers (b: May 20, 1921) moved into her grandmother’s home at 111 John St. which was next door to the south. She was 18 months old, and she lived there until about 1928. In 2002 we visited the neighborhood, and she talked in detail about the Pace house. It was owned by Almetra Pace (1866 - ?) the widow of Thomas L. Pace (1863 – 1919), and in the period of my mother’s memory her son Thomas O’Quinn Pace (1894 – 1969) and his wife Gladys (Lowry) Pace (1894 – 1978) also lived in the house. The Pace’s had no children and my mother remembers visiting them often - sometimes staying overnight. She remembers that O’Quinn was a Durham policeman. The 1940 FC lists him as being a salesman. My mother relates that the last time she saw the Paces was during a visit in the summer of 1938. As for the change from Jones St. to Albemarle, the 1940 FC lists the Pace house as being on Jones and not Albemarle. The house at 111 Jones St. was owned by Frances Elizabeth (King) Tingen (1870 – 1960), the widow of Benjamin Robert Tingen (1872 – 1915). In c1928 the city condemned the property to extend W. Morgan westward to W. Main, and Fannie Tingen sold the house. It was moved “out into the country.” I can provide history on the long gone “Tingen House.”

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Last updated

  • Fri, 08/23/2013 - 1:44pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 5.5332" N, 78° 54' 34.4412" W
US

Comments

201
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,
,

 

01.12.12 (DC tax office)

From the TP NR nomination:

Reported by a fonner resident of 205 Albemarle (formerly Jones St.) to be the Tinzen family home, this plain but handsome Neo-Colonial house, built c. 1910, exhibits characteristics of two stories with a cross-gabled roof and side hall plan. Decoration of the frame house is restricted to box cornices with returns, a two-light transom above at the entry, and turned posts on the less-than-full-facade porch.

Has been a commercial, for lease property for many years as of 2013.


 

08.23.13 (G. Kueber)

Comments

A few comments on the house at 201 Albemarle. It was not the “Tinzen (sic) house” but the “Pace house”. The Pace family was in Durham at the time of the 1910 Federal Census (FC) having come to Durham from Wake Co. My mother Dorothy Jane (Setzer) Simpers (b: May 20, 1921) moved into her grandmother’s home at 111 John St. which was next door to the south. She was 18 months old, and she lived there until about 1928. In 2002 we visited the neighborhood, and she talked in detail about the Pace house. It was owned by Almetra Pace (1866 - ?) the widow of Thomas L. Pace (1863 – 1919), and in the period of my mother’s memory her son Thomas O’Quinn Pace (1894 – 1969) and his wife Gladys (Lowry) Pace (1894 – 1978) also lived in the house. The Pace’s had no children and my mother remembers visiting them often - sometimes staying overnight. She remembers that O’Quinn was a Durham policeman. The 1940 FC lists him as being a salesman. My mother relates that the last time she saw the Paces was during a visit in the summer of 1938. As for the change from Jones St. to Albemarle, the 1940 FC lists the Pace house as being on Jones and not Albemarle. The house at 111 Jones St. was owned by Frances Elizabeth (King) Tingen (1870 – 1960), the widow of Benjamin Robert Tingen (1872 – 1915). In c1928 the city condemned the property to extend W. Morgan westward to W. Main, and Fannie Tingen sold the house. It was moved “out into the country.” I can provide history on the long gone “Tingen House.”

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