208 N. BUCHANAN BLVD.

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208 N. BUCHANAN BLVD.

208
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1912
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

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Last updated

  • Sun, 02/16/2014 - 5:06pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 15.2388" N, 78° 54' 43.9992" W
US

Comments

208
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1912
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

~1940 (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

(Below in italics is from the 1984 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Durham historian, history professor and librarian W.K. Boyd was the original owner of the circa 1912 Colonial Revival style house.    Each plane of the hipped roof carries gabled dormers; the two-story main block is three rooms deep with a five-bay main facade. Three gabled ells project from the south side; a one-story sunroom with paneled frieze is located at the north. The center bay is fronted by a small pedimented portico with box piers.

~1940 (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

 

Circa 1930 Boyd sold it to The Women's Club of Durham, which enclosed the north porch for a tea room; the venture failed and Dr. Boyd re-purchased the house.

In 1941, he sold it to Mrs. William Preston Few, widow of the Duke University president.  During World War II she rented rooms to wives and families of servicemen stationed at Camp Butner.

Mary Reamey Thomas Few in her yard, ~1940 (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

Watering her garden. (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

Ran Few in front of the eponymous "Randolph House." (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

She lived here to her death in 1971; in 1981, Brian L. South of Charlotte renovated the house as seven apartments.

1954 (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

1960 (Courtesy Dana Few Pope)

(Google)

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