2104 FAYETTEVILLE STREET

2104 FAYETTEVILLE STREET

2104
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1950
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

  • This building does not appear in any tours yet.

Last updated

Comments

2104
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1950
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

Photograph taken by Heather Slane, National Historic Register Submission, December 2017

 

This one-story, side-gabled house is unusual for the construction of a shed-roofed brick wing on the left (south) end of the façade, likely constructed in the 1950s to house a business. The main portion of the house features a side-gabled roof and a full-width gabled rear wing resulting in a triple-pile form. It has aluminum siding, two interior brick chimneys, and a combination of six-over-six wood-sash and vinyl replacement windows. A replacement door is located in a projecting, front-gabled bay on the right (north) end of the façade and is accessed by an uncovered brick stoop. Two pairs of original six-over-six wood-sash windows remain on the right elevation with an original triple window at the rear of the right elevation replaced with a single window and the wide opening enclosed with vinyl siding. A shed-roofed wing projects from the right rear (northwest). The shed-roofed, brick wing on the left end of the façade is three bays wide with metal-framed casement windows that wrap around the front corners of the wing. There is a six-light-over-two-panel door on its right elevation that is accessed by a brick stoop. County tax records date the house to 1940 and the earliest known occupants are Norman H. Cordice, a dentist, and his wife, Eugenia A. Cordice, a registered nurse, in 1958.  They were the parents to a son, who later became a dentist.

According to deed records, Norman H. Cordice and his wife, Eugenia Cordice bought this lot ion September 11, 1945 from Ida Mae Bass.  The 1940 City Directory shows Dr. and Mrs Cordice as residents of 1217 Fayetteville Street, where they rented a room.  The 1945 City Directory shows their residence as the property.at 2104 Fayetteville Street. 

Dr. Cordice treated most of the residents in College Heights with dental care.  He had a small office in the back of his house where he would perform general dentistry such as extractions and cleanings.  He was on the staff at Lincoln Hospital as well.  In 1940, Dr. Cordice had an office at 120 1/2 South Mangum Street and later moved to office space at 711 Fayetteville Street which was the former office of Dr. John Cordice, a surgeon.  It is not clear if they were related. 

It is also noteworthy, in 1939, that the first masses of Holy Cross Catholic Church were held in the dental office of Dr. Cordice for African American Catholics in Durham until they were able to build their church..

Dr. Cordice died in 1987 and Mrs. Cordice died in 1989.

On November 17, 2003, Norman H. Cordice, Jr. and his wife, Marjorie B. Cordice, sold the property to William V. Lucas and Pebbles Lindsay Lucas.  The house has had tenants periodically; but has been vacant for the past few years.

Dr. Norman H. Cordice, 4th from the left on the third row, 1938,
Consortium on the History of African Americans in the Medical Professions
UVA Board of Visitors, 2013
 

    

Add new comment