2312 ANGIER AVE

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2312 ANGIER AVE

2312
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Monday, September 29, 2008 - 10:31am

    If the City is using federal money, isn't the housing department required to determine if these buildings are eligible for the National Register of Historic Places? The building at 2312 looked pretty significant to me!

  • Submitted by Gary on Monday, September 29, 2008 - 12:33pm

    Theoretically, yes. I've tried to explore this route before, and I encountered a lot of obfuscation about which funds were being used for what, followed by several rounds of insistence that no Federal funds were being utilized for demolition of historic structures. The person in the State Historic Preservation Office who oversees the use of CDBG/HOME funds and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (the section that requires what you are referring to, as well as review of damage to historic resources by highway projects and the like) never returned by emails/phone calls.

    GK

  • Submitted by John Martin on Tuesday, September 30, 2008 - 12:03am

    And where was Preservation Durham in all of this?

  • Submitted by Steve on Tuesday, September 30, 2008 - 2:07am

    The City of Durham is so infuriating; I'm so glad I never moved there, as I almost did several years ago... my heart would have exploded by now in frustration. I just can't stand the Idiots in Charge.

    ... so short sighted in everything they do...

    Thank you, Mayor Bell. Tell UDI it's another job well done.

  • Submitted by KeepDurhamDifferent! on Friday, October 3, 2008 - 12:37pm

    What John said. Where was PD?

    Historic preservation is a cornerstone of my campaign for state senator.

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Last updated

  • Wed, 07/27/2011 - 4:33am by gary

Location

35° 58' 52.3452" N, 78° 52' 31.0404" W

Comments

2312
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 


2312 Angier Avenue, looking northwest, 10.31.07.

I was going to use the county's impending demolition of the 500 block of East Main Street as an illustrative example of how we continue to undermine the economic future of Durham, but 2312 Angier Avenue will serve just as well. Doesn't anyone in the city or the county understand that tearing down historic commercial structures is THROWING AWAY MONEY FROM THE FEDERAL AND STATE GOVERNMENTS. Does this seem like a good idea when construction financing has become a scarcity? Why doesn't the failure of destroying historic structures to generate a single positive outcome, ever, in this city not fire up at least one questioning neuron in the brains of our local government? Why do so many people who trot out the destruction of Hayti as travesty repeat the same mistake?

East Durham over the past 5 years has been in the exact same situation that Hayti was in circa 1962. Our reaction? Exactly the same: Physical blight is a contagion that must be destroyed. We've destroyed large swaths of East Durham in the name of such misguided purification, with the utterly unfounded belief that clearing away old structures will bring economic development.

Repeat after me:

Demolition does not produce economic development. Historic structures are worth more economically than new construction due to tax credits. By destroying historic structures, you are creating a larger economic hurdle for a neighborhood to overcome than it faced previously.

and

Demolition does not stop criminal activity. While I agree that demolition of a historic structure tears away at the soul, criminals do not get saved when a vacant structure is torn down.

East-of-Downtown Durham has been a diamond in the rough for many years, at best unloved and at worst abused by a lack of economic investment. Over the past 5 years, the city has been determined to pay attention to what they term "NorthEastCentral Durham", and I'm not sure the cure isn't worse than the disease. This isn't horribly unusual, unfortunately, as it is the rare local government that doesn't come into a 'troubled' area swinging a sledgehammer rather than leveraging the considerable assets of that area to create real opportunities for economic development. Demolition and the persistence of the Mayor&Pals in seeking 'solutions' like the widening of Alston Avenue are destroying the assets of East Durham that might attract the economic investment that the area needs. At the same time, the seeds of that investment have been growing - not on the newly vacant land, but in the still-extant historic structures. But, by all means, we wouldn't want that trend to continue. People might actually open functioning businesses in those buildings, or we might create homeownership.

It's tiring to say the same things over and over again, but this website has two main purposes: 1) a historical architectural record for researching Durham's past and 2) a warning for those who believe that demolishing historic structures has ever benefited Durham. I hope I've achieved some measure of success at #1, because I'm not sure that #2 will serve as anything than an incredibly unhelpful, unproductive "I told you so."


Looking northwest, 09.28.09

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.981207 -78.875289

Comments

If the City is using federal money, isn't the housing department required to determine if these buildings are eligible for the National Register of Historic Places? The building at 2312 looked pretty significant to me!

Theoretically, yes. I've tried to explore this route before, and I encountered a lot of obfuscation about which funds were being used for what, followed by several rounds of insistence that no Federal funds were being utilized for demolition of historic structures. The person in the State Historic Preservation Office who oversees the use of CDBG/HOME funds and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (the section that requires what you are referring to, as well as review of damage to historic resources by highway projects and the like) never returned by emails/phone calls.

GK

And where was Preservation Durham in all of this?

The City of Durham is so infuriating; I'm so glad I never moved there, as I almost did several years ago... my heart would have exploded by now in frustration. I just can't stand the Idiots in Charge.

... so short sighted in everything they do...

Thank you, Mayor Bell. Tell UDI it's another job well done.

What John said. Where was PD?

Historic preservation is a cornerstone of my campaign for state senator.

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