MOUNT OLIVE AME CHURCH

MtOliveAME_church_62.jpg

MOUNT OLIVE AME CHURCH

123
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1951-1960
/ Demolished in
1968-1970
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by David Southern on Wednesday, August 22, 2012 - 10:40am

    This structure is on the 1950 update of the 1937 Sanborn maps, and I'm inclined to see if it shows up on earlier maps with the same footprint and on the same site. There was a trend, just after WWII when construction boomed, to apply a brick veneer to existing wooden churches. One can see examples of this all over Durham county, and the image of Mount Olive AME appears to reveal this treatment. For instance, the belfry is bricked only on the front because the sides could not have borne the load of a course of brick. Though the gothic windows could have been recycled from an earlier building, most likely they are original to an earlier frame structure. Is the Mount Olive AME church on Fayetteville Street a successor to this Brookstown congregation?

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Last updated

  • Wed, 08/22/2012 - 8:13am by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 10.2996" N, 78° 55' 9.0984" W
US

Comments

123
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1951-1960
/ Demolished in
1968-1970
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

MtOliveAME_church_62.jpg

Comments

This structure is on the 1950 update of the 1937 Sanborn maps, and I'm inclined to see if it shows up on earlier maps with the same footprint and on the same site. There was a trend, just after WWII when construction boomed, to apply a brick veneer to existing wooden churches. One can see examples of this all over Durham county, and the image of Mount Olive AME appears to reveal this treatment. For instance, the belfry is bricked only on the front because the sides could not have borne the load of a course of brick. Though the gothic windows could have been recycled from an earlier building, most likely they are original to an earlier frame structure. Is the Mount Olive AME church on Fayetteville Street a successor to this Brookstown congregation?

Add new comment