NC MUTUAL ANNEX BUILDING

NCMutualannex_011670.jpgNCMutualAnnex_031608.jpggreenfire_armada_render_apts.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2013_6/ncmutualannex_demo1_062413.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2013_8/armadahoeffler_apts_082213.jpg

NC MUTUAL ANNEX BUILDING

501
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1970
/ Demolished in
2013
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by John Martin on Monday, June 24, 2013 - 7:24pm

    "Total project cost will be $10m and construction is planned to start in July 2012 and be completed by May 2013."

    Let's see: they're just eleven months behind schedule.  For Greenfire, I suppose, that's good.  But those apartments are really ugly. They look like a bunch of Legos propped up sideways. 

     

     

  • Submitted by dwr87 on Monday, July 8, 2013 - 6:10pm

    Here's the current status of construction (or lack thereof):

    Does anyone know what sort of rent they're planning to charge here? The location is a little questionable (in a sea of parking), so I wonder whether they might be trying to go a little bit down-market from all of the high-end stuff that's been going in over the last few years.

  • Submitted by gary on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 3:07am

    dwr87 -

    My guess would be that the rents, like many of the new construction apartment projects, would be between $1.50 and $1.80 per square foot per month. I understand what you are saying about the location, but, and I apologize for the semantic distinction,  the location is actually quite fantastic - it's the immediate context that is fairly ugly. They are 1/2 a block from American Tobacco, two blocks from Five Points, and ~ 3 blocks from the Brightleaf area. That's what they'll be selling.

    The biggest context problem, to me, is the view of the bus station across the street - they'll likely be turned away from University Ford. I know the city had some bold talk about selling the grassy strip of land at Willard and Jackson off to a developer back when they developed the station, and that seemed to go nowhere. GIS shows that it all still belongs to the city. But if the north side of Jackson Street could be developed, then there would be a decent urban corridor along that street, extending two blocks west to the EDR project on the old Sturdivant / Holiday Inn site.

  • Submitted by dwr87 on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 10:05am

    Agreed on all points - it should be exciting to see what happens in this area if and when the light rail station goes in just to the north. The nearby blocks - an abandoned apartment building, the police station (they're thinking of moving, yes?), a car dealership, and the sorry BB&T building - all seem ripe for redevelopment. It seems like it would be helpful if Duke and Gregson both went back to being two-way streets; having just two north/south streets, each one-way, is a pain to navigate.

  • Submitted by DPK on Tuesday, December 31, 2013 - 11:48pm

    The rendering of the new apartment building doesn't really seem to jive with the theme/style of American Tobacco unfortunately.

  • Submitted by JJasper on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 - 2:24pm

    As I work at ATC in the Fowler building, I walk by this construction site every day at lunch and the look just doesn't feel right (as is posted above). They put a parking deck behind it so there is no sea of concrete, but the one side faces the bus terminal, the opposite side faces the University Ford collision garage, the north side faces the BB&T building that takes up that entire block. It is a good spot from the standpoint of being a block away from ATC and one more block to DPAC, but to get to 5 points, you have to navigate the tricky intersection at Pettigrew and Chapel Hill and then go under the train tracks. Not sure what the rents are at this point but again to my original statement, the colors and the styles of these apartments do not blend well. They do look like the new apartments going up on Gregson and Chapel Hill and will probably be like the West Village Phase III style.

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Last updated

  • Mon, 06/02/2014 - 11:22am by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 42.396" N, 78° 54' 26.2296" W
US

Comments

501
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1970
/ Demolished in
2013
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

NCMutualannex_011670.jpg

01.16.70 (Photo by the Herald-Sun)

NCMutualAnnex_031608.jpg

03.16.08 (Photo by Gary Kueber)

On 02.01.12, Greenfire announced that it would, in partnership with Armada Hoeffler, redevelop this 2 acre site with newly constructed apartments. (Meaning the annex would come down.)

greenfire_armada_render_apts.jpg

(Photo via Greenfire Development)

Text of the announcement:

February 1, 2012, Durham, NC – Greenfire Development is announcing the start of an exciting transit oriented development project just south of Durham’s multi-modal transit station. This new residential project will consist of 88 one and two bedroom apartments and include housing for a local education institution as well as additional market rate housing. Greenfire will be partnering with Armada Hoffler, a development and construction firm out of Virginia Beach, VA.

This announcement will mark the 20th property Greenfire will have redeveloped or stabilized in downtown Durham. After leading an impressive wave of successful historic redevelopment projects in the city center, Greenfire is excited to be at the forefront of a new wave of ground up residential construction in downtown. “We have attracted strong partners for this project” says Paul Smith, Managing Partner of Greenfire Development. “Armada Hoffler has an excellent track record on the East Coast and we look forward to building a long term relationship with them in this market.” Project team members include J Davis Architects and Coulter Jewell as well as Built Form Architects of Chicago.

“We think downtown Durham is an underserved marketplace,” says Lou Haddad, President and CEO of Armada Hoffler. “Greenfire has done a great job in helping to transform this area and we are excited to be able to work with such a strong and committed local partner.”

The project will be located on one of Greenfire’s properties, at the corner of Jackson and Willard, adjacent to the NC Mutual building. Total project cost will be $10m and construction is planned to start in July 2012 and be completed by May 2013.

06.24.13 (Photo by Carson Harkrader)

08.22.13 (G. Kueber)

I'm not sure what in the world they are doing here - they've been moving dirt and building retaining walls like crazy, but seem to be slow to go vertical. They've definitely dug out an entire below grade (at Jackson Street) level.  An elevator tower finally made an appearance in early December 2013.

12.13.13 (G. Kueber)

02.16.14 (Photo by Gary Kueber)

02.28.14 (G. Kueber)

05.19.14 (G. Kueber)

05.31.14 (G. Kueber)

Comments

"Total project cost will be $10m and construction is planned to start in July 2012 and be completed by May 2013."

Let's see: they're just eleven months behind schedule.  For Greenfire, I suppose, that's good.  But those apartments are really ugly. They look like a bunch of Legos propped up sideways. 

 

 

Here's the current status of construction (or lack thereof):

Does anyone know what sort of rent they're planning to charge here? The location is a little questionable (in a sea of parking), so I wonder whether they might be trying to go a little bit down-market from all of the high-end stuff that's been going in over the last few years.

dwr87 -

My guess would be that the rents, like many of the new construction apartment projects, would be between $1.50 and $1.80 per square foot per month. I understand what you are saying about the location, but, and I apologize for the semantic distinction,  the location is actually quite fantastic - it's the immediate context that is fairly ugly. They are 1/2 a block from American Tobacco, two blocks from Five Points, and ~ 3 blocks from the Brightleaf area. That's what they'll be selling.

The biggest context problem, to me, is the view of the bus station across the street - they'll likely be turned away from University Ford. I know the city had some bold talk about selling the grassy strip of land at Willard and Jackson off to a developer back when they developed the station, and that seemed to go nowhere. GIS shows that it all still belongs to the city. But if the north side of Jackson Street could be developed, then there would be a decent urban corridor along that street, extending two blocks west to the EDR project on the old Sturdivant / Holiday Inn site.

Agreed on all points - it should be exciting to see what happens in this area if and when the light rail station goes in just to the north. The nearby blocks - an abandoned apartment building, the police station (they're thinking of moving, yes?), a car dealership, and the sorry BB&T building - all seem ripe for redevelopment. It seems like it would be helpful if Duke and Gregson both went back to being two-way streets; having just two north/south streets, each one-way, is a pain to navigate.

The rendering of the new apartment building doesn't really seem to jive with the theme/style of American Tobacco unfortunately.

As I work at ATC in the Fowler building, I walk by this construction site every day at lunch and the look just doesn't feel right (as is posted above). They put a parking deck behind it so there is no sea of concrete, but the one side faces the bus terminal, the opposite side faces the University Ford collision garage, the north side faces the BB&T building that takes up that entire block. It is a good spot from the standpoint of being a block away from ATC and one more block to DPAC, but to get to 5 points, you have to navigate the tricky intersection at Pettigrew and Chapel Hill and then go under the train tracks. Not sure what the rents are at this point but again to my original statement, the colors and the styles of these apartments do not blend well. They do look like the new apartments going up on Gregson and Chapel Hill and will probably be like the West Village Phase III style.

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