PARHAM PENN O'BRIANT HOUSE

/sites/default/files/images/2006_8/716holloway1979.jpg716 Holloway/sites/default/files/images/2006_8/716holloway2000.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2006_8/716holloway1979.jpg716 Holloway_2011.jpg

PARHAM PENN O'BRIANT HOUSE

716
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1900
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

 

 

Comments

  • Submitted by coco on Wednesday, August 9, 2006 - 1:12am

    I cannot believe how quickly a beautiful house can go to hell. What are the owners planning to do about this? why didn't they protect it from decay and harvesting of it's architectural details? If this was just meant to be an investment property, then it looks like they reconsidered.
    I am so pleased that you are blogging about our fair city, so that others can see the stupid destruction of beautiful architecture - and stop it from continuing!

  • Submitted by Erik on Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 5:29pm

    This house has been renovated and is now on the market: http://www.movoto.com/real-estate/homes-for-sale/NC/Durham/716-Holloway-...

Add new comment

In tours

  • This building does not appear in any tours yet.

Last updated

  • Sat, 06/01/2013 - 9:44am by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 39.6456" N, 78° 53' 16.9908" W
US

Comments

716
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1900
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

716 Holloway

(Picture by G. Kueber, 2006)

Another house featured in the 1980 architectural inventory, (and ironically noted then for its upkeep and recent renovation), 716 Holloway has been abandoned for a few years as of 2006. Per the inventory (note all present tenses refer to 1980)

This recently restored house with the prominent and unusual clipped gable roofline on the east end dates from the 1890s. The house was constructed for Parham Penn O'Briant, who began his career as a mason in the brickyard owned by his father, Calvin O'Briant, whose house stands opposite at 717 Holloway. Parham Penn O'Briant later became a cement contractor. Characteristic late Victorian features of the house include the corbelled chimney stacks and the clipped corners with rondels on the front wing. The house remains in the posession of the O'Briant family, having passed to his son, Dennis, and recently to Dennis' stepdaughter and her husband. The careful maintenance of this house distinguishes it in a block that has suffered deterioration in the last 20 years.

 

It was on the real estate market for many months for ~$35,000 before apparently selling. I peeked inside the house several months ago while it was wide open and still on the market. Although the mantels had been stolen, it appeared otherwise in good shape. As of 2006, its future appears very uncertain.

 


716 Holloway in 1999 (DC Tax Office)

716 Holloway in 1979 (Historic Inventory)

 

716 Holloway_2011.jpg

(Triangle MLS, 2011)

The house was renovated in 2009. It looks like this now:

(Anonymous, 2013)

Comments

I cannot believe how quickly a beautiful house can go to hell. What are the owners planning to do about this? why didn't they protect it from decay and harvesting of it's architectural details? If this was just meant to be an investment property, then it looks like they reconsidered.
I am so pleased that you are blogging about our fair city, so that others can see the stupid destruction of beautiful architecture - and stop it from continuing!

This house has been renovated and is now on the market: http://www.movoto.com/real-estate/homes-for-sale/NC/Durham/716-Holloway-...

Add new comment