2006 Preservation Durham Home Tour: Step Into History: Old North Durham Historic Tour

2006 Preservation Durham Home Tour: Step Into History: Old North Durham Historic Tour


North Durham is one of Durham's earliest recognized suburbs. Before its development in the 1890s, the area was part of farms belong- ing to Jesse Geer, his son Fred C. Geer, and A.M. Rigsbee. The oldest surviving house in Durham may be the Geer Farmhouse now located at 326 East Trinity Avenue.

Attorney James S. Manning and printer Henry E. Seeman led the northward migra- tion from downtown Durham as early as the 1880s. Manning's impressive Queen Anne style house at 911 North Mangum Street is distinguished by steeply peeked gables rising over a wide front porch and applied decora- tion emulating half-timbering. The Manning House has been known popularly as the Bull Durham House since 1988, when it featured as a major location in the movie Bull Durham. Residential development in North Durham began in earnest in the late 1890s. The desirability of suburban living was greatly enhanced by the construction of a north- south trolley line in 1901. Now residents of North Durham had to walk only a few blocks to Little Five Points, where Cleveland Street meets Mangum and Corporation, and catch the trolley to ride the rest of the way to the Central Business District. That same year Brodie L. Duke began real estate ventures that led to the establishment in 1908 of the Duke Land and Improvement Company. Duke had bought up much of the Geer and Rigsbee land late in the 19th century, and in 1901 he subdivided his acreage and began selling building lots.

Over the next two decades, successful businessmen and professionals built a Mansion Row of homes along Mangum Street. Many of the homes were influenced by the Colonial Revival style, with neoclassi- cal elements of Tuscan porch columns and pedimented gables accenting simple rectangu- lar houses. Occasionally, richer decoration was achieved with Ionic or Corinthian columns. The Mangum Street houses on today's tour exhibit that eclectic mix of styles, from the solid brick neo-Colonial of the Oren Belvin House (918 North Mangum) to the Arts and Crafts style of the Elliott-Ferrell House and the Pickett House (1207 and 1208 North Mangum). In between is an interesting mix of architectural styles, from the understated Christian Wynne House (921 North Mangum), built in 1925, and the ca. 1895 Mason-Umstead House (1112 North Mangum) to the more flamboyant Maynard Mangum House (1111 North Mangum) and Frank G. Satterfield House (922 North Mangum) with their wide porches, overhang- ing eaves, and prominent third-floor dormers. 

Entrepreneur Maynard Magnum was respon- sible not only for the construction of his own house, designed by Durham's Rose and Rose Architects, but also for three other houses on North Mangum and Lynch streets that he commissioned contractor Lonnie Glosson to construct for relatives and employees.

East of this new development, the old farmhouses were being surrounded by new homes as streets were built to accommodate the growing population of North Durham. The Scruggs-Fowler House (S09 Edward Street) was reportedly the first house built on Edward Street, which was cut through from Roxboro to Elizabeth Street around 191 S. Dr. James McCracken built the fanciful turreted cottage at 210 East Trinity for his mother-in-law, Mrs. SJ. Hall, in 1902. McCracken's own house on the corner of Elizabeth Street was moved slightly west to make way for the construction of the Rose and Rose designed neo-Gothic Calvary Methodist Church in 1916. Feed store owner H. Raymond Byrd built the bungalow at S 16 East Trinity in 1921, only two years before the original Geer farmhouse was moved to a site on the same block.

While things were booming to the east, the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village. Fred Geer built the folk-Victorian style house just west of Mangum Street in the 1880s, at what is now 112 West Lynch Street; the street is named for the Lynch family who lived here from the late 1880s until 1897. But it wasn't until the 1920s that investors and individuals desiring to build their own homes began to develop the area in earnest.

The bungalow was a very popular house type throughout Durham and some of the most imaginative and fanciful renditions of the style in the city are found on the south side of West Seeman Street. A row of five houses here exhibit exaggerated bungalow characteristics including long sloping roofs flaring upward at their peaks, with wide overhangs and exposed decorative rafter tails; porch supports consisting of multiple elements to emulate joinery; and applied decoration imitating structural units containing attic vents. The Tandy-Strickland House (117 West Seeman) is on the tour today. Other classic bungalows on the tour are the Mozelle and John W Moore House (112 West Trinity) and the Inscore-Clapp House (219 Dacian) where the street unexpectedly slopes up toward the west from the flat landscape of Mangum and Roxboro Streets.

Similar to many older urban neighborhoods dating from the turn of the century, North Durham has experienced a transition over the last half of the 20th century. As original and early residents left the neighbor- hood, houses were divided into apartments to meet the housing needs of the less affiuent, and many structures suffered from lack of maintenance. But more recently, new home- owners have begun rehabbing the homes of Old North Durham. Characteristic of this redevelopment is the adaptation of the small grocery store near the railroad bridge, (1214 North Mangum Street). A convenient supplement to the shopping district at Little Five Points, it was frequented by most of the North Durham residents from 1925 until the 1960s. After lying vacant for decades, it found new life in 1980 when it was adapted into an efficiency dwelling.

Old North Durham is today a vibrant and welcoming neighborhood. New families appreciate the legacy they have inherited from the pioneers, entrepreneurs, and first families who developed it and lived here a century ago.

922NMangum_1981.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_4/922NMangum_021211.jpg

922 N. MANGUM STREET - TJ HOLLOWAY HOUSE

922
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1916
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

The house was most likely built by Thomas J. Holloway, vice-president of the Holloway-Belvin Shoe Company, in 1916. In 1916, his residence is listed on Elliott Street; in 1917 he is listed here. However, it appears he did not live here long; by 1919, his wife Mrs. Lula D. Holloway is listed at the address as a widow.

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 12/15/2012 - 12:56pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 18.6444" N, 78° 53' 38.3028" W

Comments

922
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1916
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

922NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

Massive two story square shape with weatherboard siding. Hip roof with large hip roofed dormer. Massive bungalow pier- supported veranda topped with a hip roof which continues over a side carriage porch. Porch roof has several distinctive small low-pitched gables. Transom and sidelights around front door.

The house was most likely built by Thomas J. Holloway, vice-president of the Holloway-Belvin Shoe Company, in 1916. In 1916, his residence is listed on Elliott Street; in 1917 he is listed here. However, it appears he did not live here long; by 1919, his wife Mrs. Lula D. Holloway is listed at the address as a widow.

It appears to have become a rooming house soon thereafter.

1921 Residents: Clarence C. Nelson: salesman, Gilmer's Inc.; John L. Holman : salesman, Durham Motor Car Company.

Debbie & Jim Vickerys renovated the house as a Bed and Breakfast; as of 2012, it is known as the Old North Durham Inn

Find this spot on a Google Map.

36.005215,-78.893903

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210ETrinity_NHSExt_1981.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2013_1/210ETrinity_NHS_1981.jpg210ETrinity_021211.jpeg

210 EAST TRINITY AVENUE

210
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1900
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

The McCracken-Mize house is one of the most ornate small houses in Durham; it has served as offices for various organizations through the 1980s-2000s, but sold to a homeowner in 2011.

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Fri, 01/25/2013 - 8:10am by gary

Location

36° 0' 18.6444" N, 78° 53' 29.9112" W

Comments

210
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1900
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

210ETrinity_NHSExt_1981.jpg

1981

(Below in italics is from the 1984 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

According to local tradition, Dr. George McCracken, who lived at 302 East Trinity Avenue (destroyed) had this one and one half story house constructed for his mother-in-law in the 1890s. The house has undergone few alterations. Fanciful features typical of its late Victorian period of construction include the polygonal front dormer and rondels with petals of colored glass in the clipped corner facade topped with dropped pendant brackets in the gabled wings. Weatherboard siding. For many years, beginning in the early twentieth century, the Mize family lived here. The house is owned by Calvary United Methodist Church and is leased to Durham Neighborhood Housing Services, which is currently restoring it as a demonstration project intended to serve as inspiration for area residents of older houses.

As the National Register listing notes, the Neighborhood Housing Services program in Old North Durham in the early 80s transformed this into their offices.

1981

It later reverted to church offices, but in 2011 was sold to a private owner.

210ETrinity_021211.jpeg
02.12.11

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309Edward_1980.jpg309Edward_032811.jpeg

309 EDWARD STREET

309
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1912
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

In early 1912, TD Scruggs purchased a parcel of land from Mary W. Geer, an heir to the Geer farm, and built the present house upon it; he later enlarged the property with two additional parcels. He and his wife Lucy lived here until 1917. The house became home to Mary Fowler, and later, her son Atlas Jr.

 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 09/01/2012 - 6:32pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 15.8328" N, 78° 53' 24.0828" W
US

Comments

309
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1912
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

309Edward_1980.jpg

1980

(Below in italics from the 2006 HPSD home tour booklet; not verified for accuracy by this author)

In early 1912, TD Scruggs purchased a parcel of land from Mary W. Geer, an heir to the Geer farm, and built the present house upon it; he later enlarged the property with two additional parcels. Scruggs was the head of the Druham Transportation Department and manager of the Durham Livery Stable. He and his wife Lucy lived here until 1917, when perhaps defaulting on a loan, they transferred the house to the Durham Loan and Trust Co.

George O. and Mary P Fowler purchased the house in 1919, buying neighboring land in 1920 to further augment the lot. The house became home to their son, Atlas Thomas Fowler, Sr., his wife Elizabeth, and their nine children. Atlas, Sr. was a grocer and dealer of bottled soft drinks. In the late 1910s, his wholesale store on Parrish Street grew into a retail business named the O.K. Grocery, which later moved to North Mangum Street.

Atlas is noted in 1917 as living at "Fayetteville nr Umstead"; the OK Grocery was located that same year at 115 N. Mangum St. It is unclear from my research if Atlas Sr. ever lived at 309 Edward; there is no listing for the Fowlers in the 1919 city directory; in the 1921 city directory, Mary Fowler is listed as a widow, living at 309 Edward.

After Atlas Sr. passed away, his father and mother deeded the property to his widow. Mary Fowler remained in the house until her death in 1962, at which time her nine children and their surviving spouses deed the property to Atlas, Jr. and his wife. Atlas, Jr. ran Fowler's Amoco Service at 701 North Mangum St. He and his wife moved to Florida in 1975

...

309Edward_032811.jpeg
309 Edward Street, 03.28.11

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/sites/default/files/images/2011_2/geerhouse_front2_020711.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_2/Blount_GeerFarm_1867.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_2/DurhamCounty_GeerFarm_1890s.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_2/BrodieDukePropertyMap.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_2/TECheek_plat_1937.jpg

FREDERICK C. GEER FARMHOUSE / 326 EAST TRINITY AVENUE

326
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
mid-19th century
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 07/30/2011 - 3:12pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 21.3804" N, 78° 53' 21.8328" W

Comments

326
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
mid-19th century
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

The Fred C. Geer Farmhouse is one of the oldest structures remaining in the City of Durham; much like the Calvin O'Briant farmhouse on Holloway Street, the city has grown to 'enclose' the structure in a city framework, although its move down-the-'block' in 1923 to a street corner gives it less of an appearance of inconformity to the grid than the O'Briant house.

The Geer family has roots in this area of the Piedmont dating back to at least 1758, when John Geer was living in then-Rutherford County. A son, Frederick C. Geer (c 1755-c 1840) was living in then-Orange County by the early 19th century; he willed property and enslaved people to Jesse B. Geer and another Frederick C. Geer (1823-1919.) These latter two appear to have had farmhouses northeast of Durham along the Roxboro Road by the 1860s. It is this latter Fred Geer that appears to have owned the farmhouse in question, and Jesse Geer was likely his father.

[I thought I'd try to neatly present the genealogy of the Geer family related to the farmhouse, but I'll need to leave that to a genealogy buff. Seems that the southeast was rife with Fred Geers. Of interest, a few internet ancestry sites assert that Fred Geer-the youngest was the maternal great-grandfather of Ernie Barnes.]


1867 Map, showing the Jesse and Fred Geer farms.

Between Jesse and Fred, the Geer family owned a great deal of real estate in Durham. Fred became involved in a number of endeavors, including but not limited to a stake in the Durham Railroad Company, laying out Main Street (also called Pratt Street), investing in the ZI Lyon Tobacco Co. (with JW Cheek), the Morehead Banking Company, and commissioner of the short-lived incorporated town of North Durham.


1887 Map, showing the "FC Geer" farm.

In Durham's ill-fated bid for what-would-become-Meredith College, Geer offered 16 acres of land in North Durham. I suspect that some portion of this land was what he donated to the North Durham Baptist Church in 1887 (later Grace Baptist Church.)


1890 map of North Durham

The construction of the [Fred] Geer Building, built in 1914, appears to have been a focused entrepreneurial endeavor on the part of Mr. Geer; in the 1915 city directory his occupation is listed as President of the FC Geer Co., owners of the Geer Building.

Geer died in 1919.

The fate of his farmhouse immediately after that seems unclear. Geer owned so much land that I became lost in the deed records trying to track down the disposition of the parcel of land that supported his home. Per secondary sources, it was moved to the west end of the block between N. Alston and Hamlin (Rosetta) in 1923 for the construction of the Thomas E. Cheek home.


Plat from 1937 - the large parcel is the former location of the Geer Farmhouse - by then relocated to the smaller parcel at the corner of Hamlin and E. Trinity.

The house and land appear to have remained the property of Thomas Edgar Cheek until his death, seemingly at a young age, in 1947. The house appears to have gone into probate, with the Fidelity Bank, acting as guardian for Cheek's "infant daughter, Elizabeth Taylor Cheek" selling her share, their share, and TE Cheek's share to J. Langston Thomas.

JL Thomas and his wife Genevieve appear to have lived in the house until the 1960s; in November 1968, Genevieve, then widowed, sold the house to Ruby and Chauncey Planck.


1959 aerial, showing the house at the upper left hand corner of the block.

Ruby Planck, known as "Mom" to a broader audience than just her progeny, became a beloved figure to, seemingly, an entire generation of young people in Durham. Ruby ran the Cosmo Room pub, upstairs from the Ivy Room on West Main Street. There, a diverse cross-section of Durham came and passed time. Jim Wise recounts more about "Mom" in a 2008 article from the News and Observer, as well as in his book Durham Tales. The below is excerpted from Durham Tales with Jim's kind permission:

[...]
Literally speaking, [Ruby] was mom to just her own five kids, and four of the children (the eldest having moved to San Francisco back when hippies were still beatniks.) Metaphorically, though, she was Mom and her home a sanctuary for an honorary extended family of in-laws, outlaws, mystics, mechanics, gypsies, geeks, poets, professors and plumbers.

In the '60s an early '70s, Mom was chief cook and bottle washer for the Cosmo taproom above the Ivy Room restaurant ... This is where, with wit and wisdom and good conversation, she collected a clientele mixed of physicians and pilots, [EPA] engineers, and already-aging flower children; trucker, veterans, freaks, flakes, and some souls lost and some souls looking to get into that condition after reading too much Kerouac. The occasional undergraduate would get sent back to campus early if Mom knew there was a test in the morning.

After she retired, much of Mom's coterie followed to her kitchen on East Trinity Avenue, where she held court while suppers simmered, sizzled or set. "Durham" and "gourmet" were mutually exclusive terms back then, but Mom's repertoire ranged from Assyrian to Harnett County and mealtime was as likely to mean dolmades as country ham. Between the street out front and the wildlife sanctuary out back, Mom's place was a cozy confine in the world but just a little outside it, too. Roger the Anglican/Catholic/Buddhist would wax metaphysical, George the physiologist would wax emphysemic about anti-smoking attitudes. Don would talk about growing things, Elton about flying things and Phrog about blowing things up or reading to children.

The house was full of living things: dogs, cats, rats, fish, ferrets, plants, and people. It didn't take much excuse for a party. The night Chaunce turned sixty, he was the last man dancing. Thanksgiving was occasion for true feasting, and any wedding in the crowd called forth one of Mrs. Planck's splendid, towering cakes - even if, once, the slippery layers had to be held together with a calvary saber. Poker games, cooking lessons and talk -- about big bands in the '30s, wartime in the '40s (Chaunce had been in the second wave into Normandy), New Jersey in the winter and gardens in the spring, and about books and writing and writers. Gathered around her kitchen table while something simmered on the stove, over coffee in the morning or Manhattans on Friday night, conversations ranged from Depression-era politics to the proper way of stuffing grape leaves, from media criticism to Buddhist theology and from growing peas and shrubbery to the power of the written word.

Mom loved writing, and she collected writers - real and wannabe - into her fold. She encouraged, cajoled, criticized, and shared rejection slips, as well as her Ladies' Home Journal piece, to show that, yes, it could be done. Some of those fortunate souls went on to see their names in print in the bookstores, while other found there were other forms of creativity. For all, Mom remained a matron Saint.

[...]

Mom would take on any challenge, especially if it involved cooking. In 1978, someone asked her, a one-time Southern farm girl, to demonstrate authentic, down-home, folky persimmon pudding for the Festival of North Carolina Folklife. She did it, for four hot July days and 50,000 festival-goers -- though theretofore she had never made persimmon pudding in her life -- authentic, down-home, folky or otherwise. Mom's court endured, but all things end. The courtiers aged, some moved away and some passed on. Mom eventually gave up the kitchen and moved to a retirement home -- all the way insisting it was NOT a "rest" home. Right to the end, she kept her spirit, her wit and her sense of humor.

Not long before she died, a preacher came to call. They talked for a while, then the good pastor said he'd be going since Miss Ruby looked ready to nod off.

"That," she said, "is because you're boring."

Her son, Joseph Planck, sold the house in 2003 to a group of Old North Durham residents, which eventually whittled down to Tom and Janice Transue and John Compton.


326 E. Trinity, 09.20.02
(Courtesy Tom Transue)


326 E. Trinity, 09.20.02
(Courtesy Tom Transue)


326 E. Trinity, 09.20.02
(Courtesy Tom Transue)


326 E. Trinity, 09.20.02
(Courtesy Tom Transue)


326 E. Trinity, 09.20.02
(Courtesy Tom Transue)

They renovated the house and, after renting it out for a short period, sold it to the current homeowners in 2005.


Geer Farmhouse, 02.12.11


Geer Farmhouse, 02.07.11

Find this spot on a Google Map.

36.005939,-78.889398

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J2142200.JPG

316 East Trinity Ave.

316
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1922
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Craftsman Bungalow

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

Location

United States
36° 0' 19.9908" N, 78° 53' 24.7308" W
US

Comments

316
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1922
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

J2142200.JPG

Two-story Craftsman bungalow built in 1922 according to county tax records.  Similar to a number of larger, two-story bungalows built in Durham during the early twentieth century in having a full-facade front porch with large porch columns on stone piers and a second-story front dormer.

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1112NMangum_1981.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_4/1112NMangum_021211.jpg

1112 NORTH MANGUM STREET

1112
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1895-1905
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 12/15/2012 - 3:31pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 25.6644" N, 78° 53' 36.1212" W

Comments

1112
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1895-1905
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1112NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

(Below in italics is from the 1985 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Constructed around 1900 for Sol Mason, this late Victorian house was purchased in 1908 by Regnal T. Umstead, a tobacconist from Willardsville in northern Durham County. Characteristic late Victorian features of the house include the various rooflines
of pedimented gables, hipped roof dormers and a bellcast hipped roof wing, as well as scalloped boards in the gables and clipped corners surmounted by drop pendant brackets. Umstead owned the Planter's Warehouse and was a partner with Arthur Carver in his Star Brick Warehouse. Umstead died in 1933 and his wife continued to live in the house until her death in 1956. At that time, her children sold the house to Wallace Fowler, who made it his residence until he sold it in 1979 to owners who converted it into apartments.

Unfortunately, all of the windows have been replaced with single-light casements.


02.12.11
 

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1111NMangum_1981.jpgburlives_mangum.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_4/1111NMangum_021211.jpg

1111 NORTH MANGUM STREET

1111
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1914
/ Modified in
2009
Architect/Designers: 
,
Builders: 
People: 
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 12/15/2012 - 3:41pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 25.4808" N, 78° 53' 38.418" W

Comments

1111
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1914
/ Modified in
2009
Architect/Designers: 
,
Builders: 
People: 
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

1111NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

Tobacco warehouseman Maynard Mangum had this imposing two story clapboarded house constructed in 1914 by local contractor Lonnie Glosson. A similarity in the overall form, proportions and low hipped roof with deep bracketed eaves between this house and the Umstead-Rollins House next door may be due to the fact that both houses were designed by Rose and Rose, Architects. The Mangum House, however, is more overtly neoclassical on both the exterior and the interior than the Umstead-Rollins House. Here, Tuscan columns alternate with weatherboarded piers to support the one story wraparound porch. The spacious interior is dominated by a broad central hallway containing the main staircase, the center- piece of the house. The graceful staircase, flanked by Ionic columns and pilasters at its base, rises to a landing with a Palladian window where it divides symmetrically into two smaller flights that continue to the second story. Of the several houses that he built in this neighborhood, this, the grandest of them all, was Mangum's own residence.

For many years, it served as the Kempner Rice Diet Clinic, which attracted hundreds of people from all over the country for decades.

burlives_mangum.jpg

Burl Ives across W. Lynch St., in front of 1201 N. Mangum. (Courtesy Eleanor Elliott)

The house was completely renovated in 2009-2010.


1111 North Mangum Street, 02.12.11

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1207NMangum_1981.jpg1207NMangum_032811.jpeg

1207 NORTH MANGUM STREET - ELLIOTT-FERRELL HOUSE

1207
,
Durham
NC
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

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In tours

Last updated

  • Wed, 08/29/2012 - 5:07pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 28.6632" N, 78° 53' 37.7196" W

Comments

1207
,
Durham
NC
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1207NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

Two story frame house with bungalow features. Shingle siding and gable roof with exposed rafter tails and large brackets. Wraparound porch.

1207NMangum_032811.jpeg

2011

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1214NMangum_1981.jpg1214NMangum_021211.jpeg/sites/default/files/images/2013_8/1214NMangum_081713.jpg

1214 NORTH MANGUM STREET

1214
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1923
/ Modified in
1980
,
2007
Builders: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

In 1923, J.B. Mason, president of the Citizens National Bank,who lived at 1007 North Mangum Street, hired contractor Lonnie Glosson to build the store. Until 1945, it was occupied by the grocery of H. Perry Carpenter, who lived across the street at 1213 North Mangum Street. Then the business changed hands a couple of times and eventually was managed by Clyde Copley until he moved his store to the corner of East Trinity Avenue and North Roxboro Street in the mid-1950s.

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 08/17/2013 - 11:40pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 29.9628" N, 78° 53' 35.7684" W

Comments

1214
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1923
/ Modified in
1980
,
2007
Builders: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

1214NMangum_1981.jpg

1981 (Durham County Library)

(Below in italics is from the 1984 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

For many years, this small one story brick building at the edge of the Norfolk and Western Railroad tracks served as a grocery store for the North Durham and Duke Park neighborhoods. The standard storefront of plate glass windows flanking double doors is augmented by a full facade porch with molded fascia and box cornices reminiscent of neoclassical styling. In 1923, J.B. Mason, president of the Citizens National Bank,who lived at 1007 North Mangum Street, hired contractor Lonnie Glosson to build the store. Until 1945, it was occupied by the grocery of H. Perry Carpenter, who lived across the street at 1213 North Mangum Street. Then the business changed hands a couple of times and eventually was managed by Clyde Copley until he moved his store to the corner of East Trinity Avenue and North Roxboro Street in the mid-1950s. After standing empty for almost twenty- five years, the life of the building was extended in 1980 with an award-winning adaptive reuse as an "efficiency" dwelling.

The building was again abandoned and re-renovated in the mid-2000s.

1214NMangum_021211.jpeg
02.12.11 (Gary Kueber)

08.17.13 (Gary Kueber)

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1208NMangum_1981.jpg

1208 N. MANGUM ST.

1208
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1920-1930
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sun, 12/16/2012 - 9:59am by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 28.314" N, 78° 53' 35.7324" W
US

Comments

1208
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1920-1930
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1208NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

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/sites/default/files/images/2013_1/112WLynch_1985.jpg112WLynch_032811.jpg

112 WEST LYNCH STREET

112
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1889
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Fri, 01/25/2013 - 4:01pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 27.0648" N, 78° 53' 40.8912" W
US

Comments

112
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1889
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1985

 

112WLynch_032811.jpg

03.28.11

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117WSeeman_1981.jpg117WSeeman_Facade_070486.jpg117WSeemanbowtie.jpg117WSeemanDiningRm1.jpg117WSeemanDnRoom2.jpg

117 WEST SEEMAN ST.

117
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1920-1930
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

One of the Six Bungalows of Seeman Street - a row of 1920s Craftsman houses with varied unique Asian-inspired exterior detailing.

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Mon, 09/24/2012 - 11:01pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 22.2732" N, 78° 53' 43.6416" W
US

Comments

117
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1920-1930
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

117WSeeman_1981.jpg

1981

117WSeeman_Facade_070486.jpg

07.04.86

(Courtesy Bill Phillips)

National Register Nomination: Another of the six Seeman Street bungalows with oriental motif seen in peaking of roof in massive front gable over porch and side gables. One story with weatherboard siding.

Bill Phillips, who restored the house with his wife during the 1980s, had the following article about the house published in American Bungalow in the Winter 2001-2 edition. All photos courtesy Bill Phillips.

A Bungalow’s Mission

by Bill Phillips

            In 1980 my wife and I were trying to restore a log cabin on 30 acres of land, 30 miles away from Durham, but by late that year it just seemed like too much work and too much driving, so we started looking for a house in town.  By word of mouth we went to see 117 W. Seeman St, an unadvertised 1400 sq. ft. house on a 50-foot lot in a 60-year-old neighborhood. When we walked in the front door we stood in the middle of a living room that was one of the most carefully made and well preserved pieces of carpentry I had ever seen.  We were told it was a Craftsman bungalow... a what?

            Unfamiliar with the style, I still had no doubt that I was looking at a superbly designed and crafted structure, square, solid, plumb, straight, and almost an integral piece of furniture in itself.  I had started a home remodeling business and was beginning to get the essence of fine architectural detail, and I knew that we had a rare find here.  We bought it immediately, and in short order we became students of the Craftsman era.

            I quickly shed my 70’s folk/woodsman persona, and began looking toward more modern models, well... like Woodrow Wilson modern.  I bought a pair of wool knickers, I learned to tie a real bowtie; and the 1920’s of the average person became my decade of interest.  Pardon the fantasy, but the vision went so far that I trimmed my beard and began using a straight razor around the edges, honing it on a stone and leather strap.

117WSeemanbowtie.jpg

1982

            The social philosophy of Gustav Stickley was instantly appealing to me: the self-reliant, unpretentious, democratic regard for the each person, the integrity of being middle class and the desirability of functional tastes.  It seemed like a short leap from allegiance to Thoreau in the 70’s to affection for Stickley in the 80’s... and just as short a trip from a cabin on Walden Pond to a bungalow on Every Street.

            A magnificent set of mission oak dining room furniture built in 1916 and originally purchased by my grandparents had been given to me by my family.  I had not realized that there was a perfect dining room waiting for it till we found this house.  Thus began our home’s ten year transformation from its vintage state with its coat of 50’s lime green paint throughout to our eventual interpretation of how such a house might be restored/remodeled to keep its original integrity and still meet the needs and expectations of a current life style.  The house transformed, as we, its stewards, did as well over that time, having really no idea what the end of the decade might bring.

            The first room to get attention was the dining room. The walls were covered with faded and stained wallpaper... large roses, certainly not an original feature, as became clear during the hours of steam and sludge that eventually got me down to bare plaster walls.  Everyone should have to remove wallpaper... once. 

As we were planning the paint colors for the dining room we attended a home show and met a woman who was starting a home stenciling business.  The authenticity of the pattern she used is not clear, but it was extremely appealing to us.  In this room I made the commitment to strip every piece of painted brass hardware down to bare metal: hinges, door mortise lock sets, and transom lifters. It became a labor of love, sometimes love lost, that lasted for several years from room to room.  Finally, oil paint followed serious hand sanding on the woodwork.

117WSeemanDiningRm1.jpg

            Calvin Coolidge could have eaten dinner in our completed dining room and never batted an eye, though I have never been completely dictated by historical authenticity in my remodeling work. Cost considerations are a large factor in that, and utility of design is another. But my general rule has been, “never destroy anything of quality design built by skilled hands.”

117WSeemanDnRoom2.jpg

            Of course, the house within the house is the kitchen, a culinary workshop, a social crossroads, a forum for home politics.  It went well.  My wife and I seemed to want to find solutions even when there was disagreement, and I think we did fairly well at it. The kitchen had no unique architectural features and was gutted; the exterior back porch was incorporated as interior breakfast space with a wall of three French doors.  Oak was laid on the floor, instead of the original heart pine existing throughout the rest of the house, and we installed new cabinets with ceramic tile countertops.

117WSeemanKitchen_BeforeAfter.jpg

            The kitchen became the heart of the home, an engaging space, in a crowd or alone.  It produced laughter, chaos, order, soufflés, crepes, pancakes by the gross, and incomparably complex and delightful dinners for six or eight created and served by Ginny.

117WSeeman_KitchenBreakfastArea.jpg

            At this point we were three or four years into the project, and we began to sense that this was going to take a while, possibly because it should have, possibly because we had a problem with perfectionism, and possibly because there is life to be lived in the meantime.  And life as well as lifestyle, that had seemed so simple earlier, had begun to grow in layers of complexity, at moments beautiful, at moments perplexing, and at times haunting.  But the bungalow always forgave, and always waited, and we always came back to it.  And there was never a night that I wasn’t happy to come home and find the comfort and companionship waiting in its shelter.  Truthfully, I often thought that Gustav would have wanted it that way, and that, in his many pursuits, that was all he was really looking for.

117WSeemanLivingRoom.jpg

            The bathroom came quickly and on impulse just before a family visit. A vanity replaced a wall hung sink, a carpet was installed (we weren’t splashers), and a looped rod provided a shower space in the claw foot tub.  Oh yeah... the oak toilet seat.  The two bedrooms got late attention.  The living room, a tribute to the under-rated, underpaid carpentry aesthete of the 20’s, needed only the perfect paint scheme to highlight its detail. By this time I had quit painting, and we hired painters.  The same was true of the exterior.

117WSeemanChristmas Nightl.jpg

            As the 80’s ended and the 90’s began, family circumstances and goals changed. The bungalow was sold and new accommodations provided certain conveniences, particularly for our young son, such as two bathrooms, a larger yard and an extra bedroom.  But the sense of place that the bungalow provided seemed lost… possibly because there was no social philosopher such as Stickley to promote the merits of brick ranchers.  So, the ten years in the bungalow became framed as a an almost magic nostalgic moment where all (or most) of the pieces fit, a tribute to a simpler time in lifestyle as well as architectural style.

117WSeeman_031310.jpg

03.06.10

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112WTrinity_1981.jpgA5096394.jpg

112 W. TRINITY AVE.

112
,
Durham
NC
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Tue, 12/18/2012 - 4:54pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 20.268" N, 78° 53' 42.522" W
US

Comments

112
,
Durham
NC
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

112WTrinity_1981.jpg

1981

(Below in italics is from the 1984 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Of the numerous bungalows erected during the 1920s and 1930s in the 100 and 200 blocks of west Trinity Avenue, this example stands apart from the rest because of its arched front door and attached porch with sawn curved brackets in the deep eaves. Single story, weatherboard siding.

A5096394.jpg

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911NMangum_1981.jpg911NMangum_1980.jpeg911NMangum_1984.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2008_7/manninghouse_1996.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2008_7/911NMangum_072308.jpg

911 N. MANGUM ST. - JAMES MANNING HOUSE

911
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1880
People: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 12/15/2012 - 11:48am by gary

Location

36° 0' 16.47" N, 78° 53' 41.2224" W

Comments

911
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1880
People: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

911NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

911NMangum_1980.jpeg
911 N. Mangum, 1980

One of Durham earliest extant houses, and certainly one of its most elaborate surviving houses is the James Manning house, at 911 N. Mangum St. Constructed circa 1880 by attorney and, later, Judge James Manning, the house is an exuberant demonstration of the Queen Anne Style - a multifaceted roofline, projecting offset gables, copious sawnwork ornamentation adorning the gables and a polygonal wrap-around porch. The interior is no less decorated, featuring plaster ceiling medallions and frequent ornate mantelpieces. A small room projecting from the north side of the house served as Manning's office.

The Manning family was prominent in early Durham, as well as Chapel Hill. James' brother John Manning, who had his own stately house at 210 N. Dillard St., was a physician, health officer, and mayor of Durham. Brother Isaac Manning became Dean of the medical school at UNC; Manning Drive, which runs in front of the hospital, is named for him. Judge Howard Manning, who appears in the news from time-to-time chastising low-performing schools, is a contemporary member of the family, as is local physician Stuart Manning.

James Manning later moved to Raleigh when he became Attorney General of North Carolina. The house at 911 N. Mangum was later owned by the Whitted family and the Guthrie family.

In the mid-1980s, the house was featured in the movie "Bull Durham" as the candle-strewn home of Annie Savoy. Some people locally therefore refer to the house as the "Bull Durham House."

911NMangum_1984.jpg

1984

Per Jeff and Trudy Burdette, who purchased the house in 1996, it was in significant disrepair when they acquired it.


911 N. Mangum, 1996.
(Courtesy Jeff and Trudy Burdette)

They undertook a painstaking, multi-year renovation of the entire house before selling it to new owners last year.


James Manning house, 07.23.08.
 

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/sites/default/files/images/2013_1/912NMangum_1981.jpg912NMangum_032811.jpeg

912 NORTH MANGUM STREET

912
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1909
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Mary Yordy on Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:50pm

    I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

    In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

    I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Fri, 01/25/2013 - 4:08pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 16.5996" N, 78° 53' 38.994" W

Comments

912
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1909
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


1981

(Below in italics is from the 1984 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

In 1909, Dr. Archibald Currie Jordan moved into Durham from his family homeplace at Rougemont to begin a long association with the new Watts Hospital. Dr. Jordan was president of the Durham-Orange Medical Society in 1909, and in that capacity, he made the acceptance speech of thanks to George Watts when Watts gave the new Watts Hospital to the City of Durham. Dr. Jordan purchased this Neoclassical Revival house from a Mr. Booth, who had had the house constructed a few years earlier. A colossal two story portico with a pedimented gambrel roof and molded entablature and cornice supported by Corinthian columns dominates the main facade of the two story hipped roof house. A more delicate Victorian quality survives in the small polygonal rear porch (partially enclosed in later years) with turned posts, spandrels and frieze. The house has a German siding exterior.

912NMangum_032811.jpeg

03.28.11

Add new comment

Comments

I want to comment on "...the hillier west side of Mangum Street remained fields and woods separating North Durham from the Pearl Cotton Mill Village."

In the old directories the address 'Strayhorn' with no street number comes up almost as frequently as Smokey Hollow, but I've been having a hard time finding out exactly where and what it was.  In Turner's 1889-90 Durham Directory, it looks like around 40 people are listed with this address in the "Colored", and another 25 or so in the preceeding "White" listings. 

I think the area of 'fields and woods' may have included Strayhorn.  Property records for houses on Dacian between Washington and Glendale refer to Strayhorn and Strayhorn subdivision, but this is one of the only clues I've found..