G Murray Nelson-designed homes

G Murray Nelson-designed homes


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BUDD HOUSE - 903 S. DUKE

903
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1924-1926
Architect/Designers: 
People: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
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W. P. Budd, a partner in the Budd-Piper Roofing Company, commissioned Raleigh architect Murray Nelson to design this two-and-one-half-story Tudor Revival style house in the late 1920s. One of the first domestic projects by noted Durham contractor George W. Kane, the house exhibits handsome Tudoresque elements throughout. 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Wed, 06/26/2013 - 1:08pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 23.4564" N, 78° 54' 31.2084" W

Comments

903
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1924-1926
Architect/Designers: 
People: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


Looking east, 1926

The Tudor Revival house at 903 South Duke was built for WP Budd, a partner in the Budd-Piper Roofing Company, then located near Five Points. (And still in existence on Ramseur St.)

The house was designed by Raleigh architect Murray Nelson and built by Durham contractor George Kane.

The national register nomination reads:

W. P. Budd, a partner in the Budd-Piper Roofing Company, commissioned Raleigh architect Murray Nelson to design this two-and-one-half-story Tudor Revival style house in the late 1920s. One of the first domestic projects by noted Durham contractor George W. Kane, the house exhibits handsome Tudoresque elements throughout. A variety of hipped, gabled and clipped gable rooflines, as well as applied half-timbering and a stone entrance surround, characterize the exterior. The interior features Tudor-arched doorways, irregularly shaped rooms, and an enclosed winding staircase. The principal first-floor rooms are decorated with rich door surrounds and crown molding. As the only Tudor Revival style house in Morehead Hill, the Budd House is an architectural focal point of the neighborhood. (W. P. Budd, Jr.)


Looking east, 1970s.


Looking southeast, January 2008.

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04.03.11

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For Sale in 2012

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506 E Forest Hills Blvd.jpgStokes_HS_NavalClub.png

THOMAS A. STOKES HOUSE

506
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1931
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
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The Thomas A. Stokes House – one of the finest examples of Tudor Revival architecture in Forest Hills - is situated atop a hill overlooking East Forest Hills Drive and the Forest Hills Park. The sizable parcel of land on which the home sits, and the impressive number of mature trees surrounding it, combine to give the home a feeling of a country home. For the current owners, this sense of living in the country within the city is what lends their home its special appeal.

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Location

United States
35° 58' 49.3392" N, 78° 54' 40.572" W
US

Comments

506
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1931
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

506 E Forest Hills Blvd.jpg

(photograph courtesy of Alex Maness)

From the 2012 Preservation Durham Old Home Tour booklet:

The Thomas A. Stokes House – one of the finest examples of Tudor Revival architecture in Forest Hills – is situated atop a hill overlooking East Forest Hills Drive and the Forest Hills Park.  The sizable parcel of land on which the home sits (3 full lots and portions of 2 more), and the impressive number of mature trees surrounding it, combine to give the home a feeling of a country home.   For the current owners, this sense of living in the country within the city is what lends their home its special appeal.

The development of this section (section C) of Forest Hills began in February 1927 when the New Hope Realty Company surveyed the land and divided it into lots.  In that same month, they sold Lots 27 and 28 to Richard H. Wright, Jr, who held them until selling them to Thomas A. Stokes in December 1928.  Stokes – a Durham native born in 1897 – worked in the building materials trade and was a partner in the S & S Sales Company on Mangum Street.  Stokes would have been closely acquainted with Durham’s prominent builders and architects and, wisely, hired architect G. Murray Nelson to design his home. 

Nelson had already proven himself adept with the Tudor Revival style in designing the magnificent Budd House on South Duke Street in Morehead Hill in 1924.  A Canadian by birth, Nelson had been living and working in Raleigh since 1919 (first with James A. Salter and then with Thomas W. Cooper) when he opened his own office in downtown Durham in 1923.  After the Stokes House, he went on to design one of Durham’s best examples of Renaissance Revival domestic architecture in the Kronheimer House on Minerva Avenue in Trinity Park, as well as the prominent Tudor Revival Hart House on Duke’s west campus. 

The dated architectural plans for the house could not be located, so one must assume that Stokes began planning and building his house soon after purchasing the land.  The onset of the Depression, however, likely slowed his project considerably, but, by 1932, City Directories indicate that the house at 506 East Forest Hills Boulevard was complete, joining three others nearby (410, 504, and 706).  In 1940, Stokes and his wife Sadye acquired portions of adjoining Lots 24, 25 (full lot), and 26.

The exterior of the house is one of distinguished solidity.  It is a two-and-a-half-story side-gable brick house with a two-story front-gable wing.  Its Tudor features include the use of clinker brick, the second story oriel bay window with half-timbered gable above, a gabled dormer with recessed balcony, a 3-bay engaged porch with brick posts and Tudor woodwork, casement windows with heavy wood lintels, and the projecting bay window on the north elevation.

After climbing the steep hill and ascending the front steps, visitors are welcomed onto the large, restful porch.  It is this space – accentuated by the beautiful screen door – that clearly shows the home’s dual qualities of both elegance and comfort.  The interior of the house is gracefully proportioned and inherently balanced.  The rooms are spacious and light.  Upon entering the central hallway, one finds the dining room on the left and the living room to the right.  Ahead and through a doorway one reaches the central stairway leading upstairs. 

Beyond the dining room is a bright breakfast room/butler’s pantry – a particularly lovely room, due to its useful size and beautiful original cabinetry.  The kitchen is also generously sized and has been modified only slightly over the years, with an original pantry having been hidden so as to install additional cabinetry.  The current owners have plans to amend the kitchen in the future, and visitors can see an example of cabinetry finishes they have considered.

Back to the central hall, visitors can observe the small, mirrored powder room near the back door.  Certainly of its time!  The south side of the house features the large living room in the front and the cozy den in the back, while the spaciousness of the house becomes even more pronounced upstairs.  2 bedrooms on the north side of the house share a bath.  The master bedroom has a large closet (curiously leading into the hall) and a bath, and leads into a room that is now a study but that was originally designed as a nursery.  This connects to what were servant’s quarters, with their own outside access.

The house also contains a large attic and a basement, wherein visitors can see evidence of the “realm of boys”.  Each of the 3 families that have lived in the house over the years have raised two boys in it.  Early on, the basement was a locker room with real lockers!  Neighborhood boys would come over and put their football pads on before going down to the park to play football.  As witnessed by the murals still seen on the walls, the late 1970s saw musicians playing here.  It is certainly a unique space in which to consider the past.

Thomas A. Stokes was the son of Alvis H. Stokes and Mary G. Angier Stokes.  His father was a tobacconist who owned A. H. Stokes & Co. (leaf tobacco dealers) at 114 W. Parrish Street before his early death in 1899 at the age of 55.  Thomas was raised by his widowed mother, Mary, who was an Angier and the daughter of one of Durham’s most prominent businessmen and founders, Malbourne A. Angier.  He owned a general store at the corner of Mangum and Main for over 40 years.  His older daughter, Sarah Pearson Angier, married Benjamin N. Duke, and it is for her that the Sarah P. Duke Gardens were named.

After the death of Mr. and Mrs. Stokes, the house was sold to Frederick T. Melges and his wife Connie in 1976.  Melges was a prominent psychiatrist, known for his work on the role of distortions of time in psychiatric disorders.  Following passing in 1988, Connie sold the home to Bill and Marcia Lorimer in 1992, who owned the home until recently selling it to its current owners.

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Thomas Stokes was a "Cadet Naval Aviation" member of his high school Naval Club.

 

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KRONHEIMER HOUSE

1015
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1924
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

One of the more impressive residences in Trinity Park, this Renaissance Revival home was designed by G. Murray Nelson for department store owner Benjamin F. Kronheimer.

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In tours

Last updated

  • Mon, 06/25/2012 - 10:50pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 15.138" N, 78° 54' 35.0316" W

Comments

1015
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1924
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


Kronheimer House, 1925.

Benjamin Franklin Kronheimer built the Kronheimer Department Store at 315 West Main St. around ~1900 ; Kronheimer built his Renaissance Revival residence in Trinity Park in 1924. (1925 CD) Kronheimer lived in the Cleveland-Holloway neighborhood prior to constructing this home, and thus was an early standard bearer in the 'Durham Jewish migration' from Cleveland-Holloway to Trinity Park. 

The architectural inventory describes the house as such:

Enhanced by its setting back from the street on a large lot and surrounded by mature trees, the house appears to be unaltered on the exterior. The low-hipped roof covered with terra-cotta tile, sawn brackets in the deep eaves, stone relief of swags, and the Ionic stone arcade of the recessed corner porch constitute the principal aspects of the design. The focal point of th main facade is the entrance bay with an arched entry framed by Ionic columns and pilasters bearing a full entablature and three windows above framed in stone and outline by spiraling colonettes. 

Kronheimer only lived in the house a few years, as he died in 1938.


Kronheimer House, 1980.

Unfortunately, I can find little or nothing in the secondary sources about Kronheimer or Kronheimer's beyond this - if anyone wishes to do the primary research to expound upon this information, please feel free to comment.


Kronheimer House, 10.03.09
 

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WILEY AND ELIZABETH FORBUS HOUSE

3307
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1931, 1933
Architect/Designers: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

The Forbus House is a well-articulated example of the rare Norman Provincial architectural style in a city with several early twentieth-century suburbs favoring picturesque revival styles. G. Murray Nelson of Raleigh designed the house for Dr. Wiley D. Forbus and Elizabeth Burger Forbus and their daughters. The house, completed in 1931, burned in 1933 and was immediately rebuilt.

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In tours

Last updated

Location

United States
35° 57' 7.0092" N, 78° 57' 10.9152" W
US

Comments

3307
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1931, 1933
Architect/Designers: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

From the National Register nomination form, written by Cynthia de Miranda (see here for the entire text and supporting documentation):

The Forbus House has local significance under Criterion C in the area of Architecture. It is a well-articulated example of the rare Norman Provincial architectural style in a city with several early twentieth-century suburbs favoring picturesque revival styles. G. Murray Nelson of Raleigh designed the house for Dr. Wiley D. Forbus and Elizabeth Burger Forbus and their daughters. The house, completed in 1931, burned in 1933 and was immediately rebuilt. The asymmetrical massing, steeply pitched and varied roof forms, staggered chinmey stacks, masonry walls, and-most importantly-the central round tower with conical roof and vertical windows, express the Norman Provincial style of the house. The Forbus House was one of the first erected in Hope Valley, a suburban development built around a Donald Ross-designed golf course and meant to attract the faculty of a growing university as well as the second generation of successful businessmen in a booming textile and tobacco town. The house remains one of the most notable in the neighborhood and in the city due to the thorough treatment it received in an unusual architectural style. The period of significance is 1933, the year the existing house was completed.

Dr. and Mrs. Forbus hired Raleigh architect G. Murray Nelson of the firm Nelson & Cooper to design their home. Nelson had worked alone and in partnership with J. A. Salter before forming a partnership with Thomas W. Cooper in 1921; Cooper had been
chief draftsman for Salter & Nelson for the last years of that partnership. Throughout the 1920s, Nelson & Cooper designed houses in Raleigh's early suburbs, often in the Colonial Revival style. The firm also designed the State Agriculture Building on Capitol Square and buildings on the campus of North Carolina State College.  Also throughout the 1920s, Nelson kept an office in his name only in the First National Bank Building at 123 West Main Street in Durham. Nelson lived in Raleigh throughout the 1920s and had a manager run the Durham office, but he continued to list himself and his Durham address in the classified section of the city directory. It is likely that Nelson designed some houses in Durham's burgeoning suburban neighborhoods before he was engaged by the Forbuses to build their new home. As construction began on the Forbus House, another notable Nelson design was underway on Minerva Avenue in Trinity Park: the Kronheimer House is a large, two-story brick house designed in the Renaissance Revival style with Italian or Mediterranean influences and featuring that style's characteristic tiled hip roof, arched windows and door, and deep, bracketed eaves. A recessed comer porch-with arches supported by slender Ionic columns-gives the house a slightly asymmetrical facade, an unusual element in the style. Still, Nelson's Kronheimer House is the city's "foremost example" of the Renaissance Revival style, just as the Forbus House is Durham's best representation of the Norman Provincial style.

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DR. J. DERYL HART HOUSE / PRESIDENT'S HOUSE - DUKE UNIVERSITY

2324
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1933
/ Modified in
2004
Architect/Designers: 
People: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Mon, 06/25/2012 - 10:49pm by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 33.3672" N, 78° 56' 26.3652" W
US

Comments

2324
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1933
/ Modified in
2004
Architect/Designers: 
People: 

 

harthouse_040312.jpg

04.03.12

Built in 1933 and extensively renovated in 2004, the Hart House is [as of 2012] the home of Duke President Richard H. Brodhead - returning the presidential residency to campus for the first time since the 1960s. The three-floor building, constructed from brick and timber, borders the Duke football field at the corner of two main roads.

Built for Dr. Deryl Hart when he came to Duke as head of surgery, he remained in the home through his university presidency (1960-63) until his 1980 death; his wife, Mary Hart, continued living in the house until she died in 2000.

Per the Durham Inventory:

Of the five houses built for faculty members of Duke University in the initial development of the West Campus, this rambling Tudor Revival style house is the only one built almost entirely of brick. Unlike the other four houses, this house was designed by Raleigh architect Murray Nelson and constructed by local constractor George Kane in 1934. Simliar to the other houses nearby, the Hart House has half-timbering on the upper stories of some of the gabled wings, as well as decorative chimneys that include corbelled stacks and octagonal chimney pots. Dr. J. Deryl Hart, one of the founding chairmen of the Medical School, was head of the Department of Surgery for many years, as well as President of Duke University from 1960 to 1963.

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Nelson also designed the Agriculture Building in Raleigh, which is located just north of the State Capitol. http://www.rhdc.org/agriculture-building