WEST TRINITY AND FOSTER - EAST

/sites/default/files/images/2010_6/trinity_foster_may1938.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_6/fosterandtrinity_e_031310.jpg

WEST TRINITY AND FOSTER - EAST

,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Neighborhood: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Steve Graff on Friday, June 25, 2010 - 9:23pm

    It's interesting to note how much "lower" the granite curbs are today as compared to the old picture. The rising tide of asphalt is overtaking our old curbs.
    It would be nice if the next time the city re-surfaces many of our old streets that they scrape them down so that we can once again have effective curbs that channel water towards storm drains, and also act as an impediment to parking up on the curb. There are also places where I can see beautiful old bricks peeking out from under old broken asphalt.

  • Submitted by David Jeffreys on Saturday, June 26, 2010 - 1:33am

    Also interesting that in 1938 this particular corner hearalded the present street corner signs, though it does still have the name painted on the curb. Whatever happened to those beautiful vertical obelisks at the street corners with the names on them? That was a nice touch and I think they are all gone. Does anyone have an obelisk remaining on their street corner?

  • Submitted by D N on Saturday, June 26, 2010 - 3:30am

    David: Gary has written about those signposts before, so he can correct me if he's wrong, but I believe the last known one is at Gordon/Yancey near 147/Chapel Hill St.

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Last updated

  • Mon, 07/11/2011 - 12:53pm by gary

Comments

,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Neighborhood: 

 


West Trinity Ave. from Foster St., May 1938.
(Courtesy Duke Forest Collection)


West Trinity Ave. from Foster St., 3.13.10
(Copyright Endangered Durham)

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36.005502,-78.901344

Comments

It's interesting to note how much "lower" the granite curbs are today as compared to the old picture. The rising tide of asphalt is overtaking our old curbs.
It would be nice if the next time the city re-surfaces many of our old streets that they scrape them down so that we can once again have effective curbs that channel water towards storm drains, and also act as an impediment to parking up on the curb. There are also places where I can see beautiful old bricks peeking out from under old broken asphalt.

Also interesting that in 1938 this particular corner hearalded the present street corner signs, though it does still have the name painted on the curb. Whatever happened to those beautiful vertical obelisks at the street corners with the names on them? That was a nice touch and I think they are all gone. Does anyone have an obelisk remaining on their street corner?

David: Gary has written about those signposts before, so he can correct me if he's wrong, but I believe the last known one is at Gordon/Yancey near 147/Chapel Hill St.

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