806 NINTH STREET

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806 NINTH STREET

806
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1960-1965
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

Comments

  • Submitted by robby on Tuesday, September 29, 2009 - 11:41am

    The Biscuit King location was Little Pigs BBQ" in the mid 1960s. This was a Memphis Tn based BBQ chain that did not last long.Renaldi also had additional locations in Raleigh and Chapel Hill.I beleive he might have sold out to Genos.

  • Submitted by Gary on Tuesday, September 29, 2009 - 11:49am

    You are right, Robby - I forgot the first entry in the city directories for 816, which is listed as "Little Pigs of America" - I've made the correction.

    GK

  • Submitted by next time on Tuesday, September 29, 2009 - 1:00pm

    fine and dandy that a new structure might possibly go up someday, but was it really necessary to run out the Biscuit King folks and then leave the building sitting there to rot? they were a fine establishment, and it burns me up that the rug was swept from under them and durham must see the building yet not be able to feast on the enormous biscuits!

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 29, 2009 - 1:33pm

    Didn't Pete Rinaldi also open a Kentucky Fried Chicken on North Miami Blvd.? There is a KFC there now and I can remember seeing Pete Rinaldi there.I lived close to Wellons Village back in the Good Old Days and ate a lot of chicken from there.

  • Submitted by Dave Piatt on Wednesday, September 30, 2009 - 8:54pm

    Pete Rinaldi is one of the few people I vividly remember from my early youth. It was a family operation, I remember his mother as well. My father stopped by a pursesnatcher that took her purse once, and she sent a Christmas Card to him every year after that, until she passed. Imagine that happening these days.

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 12:08am

    I live on the block that will one day be filled up with this monstrosity, and will be very sad to say goodbye to the affordable, right sized housing my husband and I found here. Chances are, my neighbors and I will have little chance of affording the luxury apartments planned for this space, much to my chagrin.

  • Submitted by Tricia on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 7:24pm

    My brother-in-law was a Physicist at Duke University and he married my oldest sister in 1960. He worked with a Dr. Block I believe. They lived in an apartment near Duke for a short time before moving to Bologna, Italy for a year. On their return to the States, they settled up North. She is deceased but we are all on vacation now & he told my niece he & my sister were married by a magistrate in an office on 9th Street but he can't remember his name. Would anyone know how I might find that information? He will be 80 this year!

  • Submitted by Tricia on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 7:24pm

    My brother-in-law was a Physicist at Duke University and he married my oldest sister in 1960. He worked with a Dr. Block I believe. They lived in an apartment near Duke for a short time before moving to Bologna, Italy for a year. On their return to the States, they settled up North. She is deceased but we are all on vacation now & he told my niece he & my sister were married by a magistrate in an office on 9th Street but he can't remember his name. Would anyone know how I might find that information? He will be 80 this year!

  • Submitted by Tricia on Wednesday, August 6, 2014 - 7:24pm

    My brother-in-law was a Physicist at Duke University and he married my oldest sister in 1960. He worked with a Dr. Block I believe. They lived in an apartment near Duke for a short time before moving to Bologna, Italy for a year. On their return to the States, they settled up North. She is deceased but we are all on vacation now & he told my niece he & my sister were married by a magistrate in an office on 9th Street but he can't remember his name. Would anyone know how I might find that information? He will be 80 this year!

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Last updated

  • Mon, 10/14/2013 - 10:53pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 39.4344" N, 78° 55' 18.4152" W

Comments

806
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1960-1965
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 


806 Ninth St., 09.12.09


Looking west from ~Iredell, ~1950.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

The east side of the 800 block of Ninth St. was residential through much of the 20th century. A frame structure at the north end of the block housed the West Durham Wet Wash Laundry, which became the White Star Laundry, during the 1920s - before that business moved to the north side of B/Green St. ~1930. That building was abandoned by the early 1930s, and torn down by the 1940s.


1959 aerial.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

By the early 1960s "Rinaldi's Take Home Restaurant" had been built at 806 Ninth St. I wrote about Pete Rinaldi's father's restaurant, Rinaldi's, located at Peabody and West Main St., previously. Evidently Pete Rinaldi, who went to school at EK Powe School in West Durham, went on to start the restaurant at 806 West Main St. Rinaldi's evidently had an early franchise agreement with Kentucky Fried Chicken, where Rinaldi would be allowed to keep his own name on the restaurant. Per John Schelp's account on my previous post:

"Durham's first Kentucky Fried Chicken was at 806 9th Street. The owner asked Colonel Sanders if he could call his franchise, 'Pete Rinaldi's Kentucky Fried Chicken.' The Colonel agreed -- making this restaurant one of a few KFCs in the nation to carry its owner's name. During his visits to the Duke Rice Diet, the Colonel enjoyed standing next to his life-sized fiberglass likeness (accurate down to the eyeglasses and Rotary pin) at the KFC and startle the beejeezus out of customers."

Another commenter described Mr. Rinaldi as:

"...just an all around great man! Pete would never charge police, firemen, soldiers, or EMT service people for their meals. Pete was generous almost to a fault (if there is such a thing). Pete always wore a crisp white button-up shirt, a thin black leather vest, and a rustic-style tie. Pete was an Itallian (just in case you couldn't tell by the name), and to him, keeping his "jet black" hair and his health as long as he could was very important. "

By the 1970s, though, it was simply known as Kentucky Fried Chicken.

(Pete Rinaldi evidently went on to open another Rinaldi's restaurant on Guess Road which was very popular, sporting the logo "Takin' Care of Chicken Business." After Mr. Rinaldi's death ~1990, it was replaced by a Bojangles.)

By 1985, the KFC was out of business.

This section of Ninth St. appeared to have a certain desolation to it from the time I arrived in Durham 20 years ago; Biscuit King, at 816 Ninth Street, retained a strong following.

Several years ago, after the completion of Ninth Street North across the street, Glenn Dickson (owner of all the parcels) announced that there would be a Phase II to Ninth Street North on this stretch of Ninth St. Biscuit King was shut down, and a redevelopment plan was put together. This plan stalled for some time, but recently seems to have revived in revised form. Of the remaining three buildings, only the former Rinaldi's houses a tenant - the Nancy Tuttle May art studio.

rinaldininth_rbow_050611.jpg

The recently revised plan envisions a significantly higher density development than originally contemplated. Bull City Rising described the potential development as follows:

[...] central to the agreement: building heights, which under current zoning could in theory reach 145' tall; the developer has agreed to a scale-down of heights as the structure moves from the more-commercial Elmo's side to the largely residential Green St.

On the southern end of the site, heights could reach 75' with a 9' stepback making the penthouse level invisible from the street, and with an overall average height of 65'. Heights step down to a low of 50' nearest Green St., with building heights limited to four story for all-residential or three story for office/commercial space. A 50' buffer strip between Green St. and the project would contain no structures, save for possible outside tables for dining.

Most of the new retail space created by the project would sit on the main block between Ninth and Iredell (19,700 retail sq. ft.) or in a new multi-story structure to eventually be built where Vin Rouge and Blu sit today (18,000 sq. ft. retail, with 64,650 sq. ft. of office space above.) For comparison's sake, the existing first phase of Ninth Street North contains 12,500 sq. ft. of retail and an equal amount of office space.

In other requirements, the developer agreed to completely hide the visibility of the structured parking deck at the center of the Iredell/Green/Ninth block via the building structures, save for the entrances -- it initially would have been visible from both Iredell and Green -- and to allow only one drive-in window, for a possible bank, to be located in the deck structure itself.

Stucco can make up no more than 20% and glass no more than 25% of the structure, which must be articulated so as to avoid presenting "a long, unbroken plane to the street."


(Courtesy Bull City Rising)

Who knows what this will end up looking like in the long run, if it gets built. But I give the developer points for 1) endeavoring to create more urban spaces and higher density use of land in close proximity to existing retail, Duke, etc. and 2) not tearing down the existing structures until ready to actually build.

Sure, I regret the loss of these structures to new development, but if that new development actually maximizes the use of the land while creating a pedestrian-scale, architecturally interesting, walkable environment - well, that's when there is actually some sense in replacing the underutilized, low-density existing structures. It's just so unbelievably rare in Durham that we aren't just tearing down for a lower-and-more-desolate land use, or some government-funded 60's-style non-urban structure like the new bus station, that it's rare that we have to actually contemplate the relative benefits of creating a more livable pedestrian environment vs. preservation. That's when I say that recycling the building materials from these buildings - while creating a development that can maximize walking trips, transit use, etc. and, ideally, divert development from greenfields - may be the most sustainable future for the site.
 

Comments

The Biscuit King location was Little Pigs BBQ" in the mid 1960s. This was a Memphis Tn based BBQ chain that did not last long.Renaldi also had additional locations in Raleigh and Chapel Hill.I beleive he might have sold out to Genos.

You are right, Robby - I forgot the first entry in the city directories for 816, which is listed as "Little Pigs of America" - I've made the correction.

GK

fine and dandy that a new structure might possibly go up someday, but was it really necessary to run out the Biscuit King folks and then leave the building sitting there to rot? they were a fine establishment, and it burns me up that the rug was swept from under them and durham must see the building yet not be able to feast on the enormous biscuits!

Didn't Pete Rinaldi also open a Kentucky Fried Chicken on North Miami Blvd.? There is a KFC there now and I can remember seeing Pete Rinaldi there.I lived close to Wellons Village back in the Good Old Days and ate a lot of chicken from there.

Pete Rinaldi is one of the few people I vividly remember from my early youth. It was a family operation, I remember his mother as well. My father stopped by a pursesnatcher that took her purse once, and she sent a Christmas Card to him every year after that, until she passed. Imagine that happening these days.

I live on the block that will one day be filled up with this monstrosity, and will be very sad to say goodbye to the affordable, right sized housing my husband and I found here. Chances are, my neighbors and I will have little chance of affording the luxury apartments planned for this space, much to my chagrin.

My brother-in-law was a Physicist at Duke University and he married my oldest sister in 1960. He worked with a Dr. Block I believe. They lived in an apartment near Duke for a short time before moving to Bologna, Italy for a year. On their return to the States, they settled up North. She is deceased but we are all on vacation now & he told my niece he & my sister were married by a magistrate in an office on 9th Street but he can't remember his name. Would anyone know how I might find that information? He will be 80 this year!

My brother-in-law was a Physicist at Duke University and he married my oldest sister in 1960. He worked with a Dr. Block I believe. They lived in an apartment near Duke for a short time before moving to Bologna, Italy for a year. On their return to the States, they settled up North. She is deceased but we are all on vacation now & he told my niece he & my sister were married by a magistrate in an office on 9th Street but he can't remember his name. Would anyone know how I might find that information? He will be 80 this year!

My brother-in-law was a Physicist at Duke University and he married my oldest sister in 1960. He worked with a Dr. Block I believe. They lived in an apartment near Duke for a short time before moving to Bologna, Italy for a year. On their return to the States, they settled up North. She is deceased but we are all on vacation now & he told my niece he & my sister were married by a magistrate in an office on 9th Street but he can't remember his name. Would anyone know how I might find that information? He will be 80 this year!

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